sitting on the fence

stranded Pink-necked Green Pigeon fledgling

My parents live on the East side of Singapore; it takes about 25 minutes to drive from my home in the South-Central part of the island. Singapore is about 42km at its widest points from East to West, 22.5km from North to South; the area occupied is slightly more than 3.5 times the size of Washington, D.C. So, I am covering quite a bit of the island with that drive (about 16km).

After visiting my parents this past Sunday, Loving Husband and I ran to the closest Catholic church, exploring the neighbourhood in the process. Along the fence bordering St Stevens School, I chanced upon this Little Critter. I was most surprised that it did not fly off when I stopped. Even after pointing my phone at it for several shots, he only nervously pumped his tail up and down.

Pink-necked Green Pigeon Mom & Fledgling

Its mom did check in for a brief moment; I speculate to persuade Little Critter to fly to safety. When I raised my phone, she quickly & effortlessly flew up to an adjacent tree. Little Critter may have been light as a feather, but didn’t look like it was going to fly anywhere for a while.

I hope Mom eventually persuaded Little Critter home.

Bird on Samsung TouchWiz Nature UX 2

This recording of birdsong is not as dramatic as the last, but I hope Little Miss enjoys this, Laurie Graves.

This post is my contribution to One Word Sunday: Light hosted by Debbie at TravelWithIntent

12 Comments

  1. Ju-Lyn, aww, the little baby chick looks so vulnerable and I’m glad it’s safe in the end! The mother green pigeon is astonishing, so lush and grand in its colourings! Here grey is common for them and they are considered rather dozy birds with a lot of flapping for little flying … listening to their cooing as I write this!

    Like

    1. Goodness! Does the constant cooing drive you crazy? You made me chuckle with your observation on their flapping and going mostly nowhere …

      We mostly see the grey ones as well. The green pigeons are not uncommon, but they roost mostly in trees, not pottering about on pavements like their grey brethren!

      Liked by 1 person

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